Colloquium

Colloquium

Friday, April 26, 2019 - 3:10pm to 4:00pm  ·  Colloquium
Prof. Ben Hunt

TBD

Friday, April 12, 2019 - 3:10pm to 4:00pm  ·  Colloquium
Prof. Nandini Trivedi

TBD

Friday, April 5, 2019 - 3:10pm to 4:00pm  ·  Colloquium
Dr. Joshua Wood, University of Wisconsin

TBD

Friday, February 22, 2019 - 3:10pm to 4:00pm  ·  Colloquium
Prof. Charles Gammie, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

TBD

Friday, February 8, 2019 - 3:00pm to 4:00pm  ·  Colloquium
Prof. Morgan E O'Neill, Stanford University

TBD

Friday, October 26, 2018 - 3:10pm to 4:00pm  ·  Colloquium
Dr. Sami Mitra, Physical Review Letters

In a talk structured to encourage interspersed Q and A, I will discuss
the dissemination of your physics results that follows the lab, the
keyboard, and the desk. You communicate results through posters,
talks, and papers in a cascading sequence that entails interacting
with journal editors, referees, conference organizers, journalists,
department chairs, deans, funding agencies, and others. I will focus
on this post-research collaborative process in physics, now in a state
of flux in the age of social media and Google Scholar, primarily

Friday, October 19, 2018 - 3:10pm to 4:00pm  ·  Colloquium
Prof. Ningyu Liu, Department of Physics, University of New Hampshire

Lightning discharges come with a variety of forms, and their intensity measured in terms of current or radiated radio power spans a wide range. This colloquium will be focused on discussing our recent research work on three classes of extreme lightning. The first class is cloud-to-ground lightning flashes of a very large peak current, a few times larger than the average value. High-speed optical images will be presented to show their complex temporal and spatial properties.

Monday, October 15, 2018 - 4:10pm to 5:00pm  ·  Colloquium
Prof. Branislav Nikolic, University of Delaware

AbstractThe control of recently observed spintronic effects in topological-insulator/ferromagnetic-metal (TI/FM) heterostructures is thwarted by the lack of understanding of band structure and spin texture around their interfaces.

Friday, October 5, 2018 - 1:10pm to 2:00pm  ·  Colloquium
Dr. Margaret "Peggy" Shea

Dr. Margaret “Peggy” Shea, the first woman to earn an advanced degree in physics from UNH and a pioneer of her time, will be on campus on Friday, Oct. 5, to receive the 2018 Distinguished CEPS Alumni Award. Prior to the award ceremony, Peggy and her husband, Don D. Smart, D. Sc., will also be hosting a semi-technical talk for students.

Friday, September 28, 2018 - 3:10pm to 4:00pm  ·  Colloquium
Prof. Gregory Fuchs, Cornell University

AbstractFor decades, computers have used small magnetic domains within a magnetic material to store information.  As the magnetic bits scaled are down to enable ever more dense information storage, we have to worry about thermal fluctuations that can re-orient them, changing a 0 into a 1.  As a potential alternative, I will discuss