Colloquium

Colloquium

Friday, May 1, 2020 - 3:10pm to 4:00pm  ·  Colloquium
Student Research Presentations

TBA

Friday, April 17, 2020 - 3:10pm to 4:00pm  ·  Colloquium
Aleks Diamond-Stanic, Bates College

TBD

Friday, April 10, 2020 - 3:10pm to 4:00pm  ·  Colloquium
Ming Zhang, Florida Institute of Technology

TBD

Friday, April 3, 2020 - 3:10pm to 4:00pm  ·  Colloquium
Cynthia Keppel, Hampton University

TBA

Friday, March 27, 2020 - 3:10pm to 4:00pm  ·  Colloquium
Brian Beckford, University of Michigan

The KOTO experiment at J-PARC aims to help explain why we live in a matter dominant universe. It is believed that Charge-Parity (CP) violation is critical in this asymmetry, and studying where new CP violation can enter beyond the predictions of the Standard Model (SM) is an exciting frontier for discovering new physics.

Friday, March 13, 2020 - 3:10pm to 4:00pm  ·  Colloquium
James Clemmons, University of New Hampshire

The interconnection between the Earth’s ionosphere and its thermosphere is explored through observations of thermospheric anomalies and their associated phenomena.  The characteristics of several types of anomalies are presented and the central role played by ion-neutral coupling in forming them is discussed through analysis, theory, and modeling.  A particular focus is on the high-altitude winds that both act as drivers and signatures of forcing.  New questions regarding I-T interactions are developed based on the results, and future investigations designed to answer these questions are fr

Friday, March 6, 2020 - 3:10pm to 4:00pm  ·  Colloquium
Joachim Saur, Cologne University

TBA

Friday, February 14, 2020 - 3:10pm  ·  Colloquium
Elena Long, University of New Hampshire

Since the discovery of the proton in 1917, physicists have been studying its properties: Asking questions about the internal structure and external phenomena of this basic piece of matter. This past century has been working to build an understanding that begins at the most fundamental quark level, builds up to protons and neutrons, and describes how they come together to form the atomic nuclei that make up everything we see around us.

Friday, January 31, 2020 - 3:10pm  ·  Colloquium
Francois Foucard, University of New Hampshire

Over the last few years, gravitational wave detectors have rapidly transformed from fundamental physics experiments to astrophysical observatories. The groundbreaking discovery of two merging black holes was followed by 10 more confirmed binary black hole mergers, 2 neutron star mergers, and dozens of additional events, which are still being analyzed.

Friday, November 15, 2019 - 3:10pm to 4:00pm  ·  Colloquium
Dr. Ashley Perko, Dartmouth College

The standard paradigm for producing dark matter in the early universe is thermal production, which freezes out at a constant abundance when the interaction rate with the Standard Model becomes slower than the Hubble expansion.