Colloquium

Colloquium

Friday, May 1, 2020 - 3:10pm to 4:00pm  ·  Colloquium
Student Research Presentations

TBA

Friday, April 17, 2020 - 3:10pm to 4:00pm  ·  Colloquium
Aleks Diamond-Stanic, Bates College

TBD

Friday, April 10, 2020 - 3:10pm to 4:00pm  ·  Colloquium
Ming Zhang, Florida Institute of Technology

TBD

Friday, March 27, 2020 - 3:10pm to 4:00pm  ·  Colloquium
Brian Beckford, University of Michigan

TBA

Friday, March 6, 2020 - 3:10pm to 4:00pm  ·  Colloquium
Joachim Saur, Cologne University

TBA

Friday, February 28, 2020 - 3:10pm to 4:00pm  ·  Colloquium
Cynthia Keppel, Hampton University

TBA

Friday, February 7, 2020 - 3:10pm  ·  Colloquium
Elena Long, University of New Hampshire

TBD

Friday, January 31, 2020 - 3:10pm  ·  Colloquium
Francois Foucard, University of New Hampshire

Over the last few years, gravitational wave detectors have rapidly transformed from fundamental physics experiments to astrophysical observatories. The groundbreaking discovery of two merging black holes was followed by 10 more confirmed binary black hole mergers, 2 neutron star mergers, and dozens of additional events, which are still being analyzed.

Friday, November 15, 2019 - 3:10pm to 4:00pm  ·  Colloquium
Dr. Ashley Perko, Dartmouth College

The standard paradigm for producing dark matter in the early universe is thermal production, which freezes out at a constant abundance when the interaction rate with the Standard Model becomes slower than the Hubble expansion.

Friday, November 8, 2019 - 3:10pm to 4:00pm  ·  Colloquium
Dr. Lionel London, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

The years following the LIGO-Virgo collaboration’s September 14th, 2015 breakthrough detection of gravitational waves have been filled by marked advances in our ability to detect and infer the source parameters of merging binary black hole systems.