Colloquium

Colloquium

Friday, April 12, 2019 - 3:10pm to 4:00pm  ·  Colloquium
Prof. Nandini Trivedi

TBD

Friday, April 5, 2019 - 3:10pm to 4:00pm  ·  Colloquium
Dr. Joshua Wood, University of Wisconsin

TBD

Friday, February 22, 2019 - 3:10pm to 4:00pm  ·  Colloquium
Prof. Charles Gammie, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

TBD

Friday, November 30, 2018 - 3:10pm to 4:00pm  ·  Colloquium
Prof. Thorsten Hesjedal, University of Oxford

TBD

Friday, October 26, 2018 - 3:10pm to 4:00pm  ·  Colloquium
Dr. Sami Mitra, Physical Review Letters

TBD

Friday, October 5, 2018 - 3:10pm to 4:00pm  ·  Colloquium
Prof. Branislav Nikolic, University of Delaware

AbstractThe control of recently observed spintronic effects in topological-insulator/ferromagnetic-metal (TI/FM) heterostructures is thwarted by the lack of understanding of band structure and spin texture around their interfaces.

Friday, September 28, 2018 - 3:10pm to 4:00pm  ·  Colloquium
Prof. Gregory Fuchs, Cornell University

TBD

Friday, September 14, 2018 - 3:10pm to 4:00pm  ·  Colloquium
Prof. Fran Bagenal, Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences and Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, University of Colorado

TBD

Friday, April 27, 2018 - 3:10pm  ·  Colloquium
Dr. Ben Chandran, University of New Hampshire

Beginning with Parker's 1958 paper predicting a supersonic outflow from the Sun, theoretical investigations and spacecraft measurements have led to considerable progress in our understanding of the solar wind. In this talk, I will review one of the leading models for the solar wind's origin and discuss what this model may tell us about more distant astrophysical outflows. In this model, the solar wind is powered primarily by Alfven waves, which are like waves on a string, where magnetic field lines play the role of the string.

Friday, April 6, 2018 - 3:10pm to 4:00pm  ·  Colloquium
Victor Watson Brar, University of Wisconsin - Madison

Abstract: Graphene, an atomically thin sheet of carbon atoms, is a two dimensional semi-metal in which the electrons behave as massless Fermions. Because it is extremely thin and has a low carrier density, the local electronic structure of graphene can be strongly modified by impurities found either in the nearby environment, or introduced via intentional doping. This talk will discuss several impurity related phenomena that are observed in graphene and how they can modify the macroscopic properties that are observed in graphene devices.